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Dwarf Guide: Deploy And Conquer


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#1 Dourin

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 05:31 PM

To help the beardlings out and to add to the Dwarf Guide in progress, I've compiled an article regarding the art of deployment. Here it is, all comments are welcome.

The goal of this article is to help the beginning dwarf player gain an insight in how an dwarven army is deployed in function of a battleplan, and perhaps even to aid some of the veteran players out there to come up with new ideas and post them here. Some of the ideaís presented here originate from the 6th edition Dwarf Army book, but itís always handy to include them in this article since they are in a way the most basic way for a defensive dwarven army to deploy. Also, since these tactics didn't make it into the new army book, most beardlings will be unfamiliar with them.

This article concerns the tactics and art of dwarven deployment. Dwarfs are an army that naturely take easier to playing defensively then offensively due to their low movement rate and utter lack of cavalry. The payoff for this are of course high toughness, high leadership, high armoursaves and the best and most versatile shooting units and warmachines.

The way you deploy your army will always depend on your mode of play, and on your armylist. If your armylists only consists of combat units, you will deploy and play very differently than if you were to play an all shooting unit army.

Important things to keep in mind:

Always deploy with a battleplan in mind:
Your deployment should always be made with your battleplan in mind. If youíre going for an offensive tactic, itís not going to help you to deploy defensively.

Deploy in a tight formation
In most cases, deploying in a tight formation is the very epitome of dwarven deployment. Donít spread your battleline too thinly but rather keep your units together to work as a coherent whole. If you deploy your units in a much too openly fashion, your units will get seperated and destroyed: divide and Conquer as it were. This should be avoided at all times unless absolutely unavoidable or part of a battleplan.

Try to learn from every game:
The best way to advance your grasp of deployment tactics is to take some notes of your deployment during and after the game, talk the battle over with your opponent. Ask him what you could have done to deploy better, with the battle in hindsight. This is not only the smart thing to do in a tactical respect, but it's also good sportmanship. Talk to your opponent and try to learn from him/her. You'l come to realise things if only because you'll get to see your army from an opponent's point of view. You'll find that most competent players will be more than happy to help you out. It's things like this that can add to the funfactor of any game.

Also, donít be afraid to take your time to deploy, within reason of course. If it helps, take a sheet of paper and draw your batteline. Since some people have problems imagining these things on the battlefield, drawing your battleplan/deployment up front can prove to be a big help.

Last but not least, remember that every victory is an opportunity to hone your skills. Every loss is an opportunity to overcome errors.

Use lone warmachines (with surprises) on your flanks and/or the far flanks of the battefield
When deploying, it usually pays off to deploy a relative cheap and effective warmachine, in most cases a bolt thrower, on the far side of your deployment zone. Doing so will force your opponent to either deal with it and commit a unit to deal with your warmachine, or risk exposing the flank of itís other units for a potentially devastating flank shots. This way, youíll end up facing fewer enemy models and consequently have a greater chance of winning combat on the other side of the table.

Also, keep in mind that things like entrenchment and the valiant rune can add to the number of turns your opponent has to commit his units to taking out your single, cheap warmachine. Note that the Master Rune of Immolation can also provide a nasty surprise without risking damage to your main units.



Make sure your warmachines have line of sight to as many enemy units as possible, but...
It almost goes without saying, but the only way your warmachines are going to be useful, is if they are able to see things to shoot at. Make sure however that they are either shielded on the side by combat units or that they are defended by the terrain itself.

...donít be afraid to deploy in woods and forests.
If the terrain doesnít allow you to immediately field all your warmachines with excellent lines of sight, it can perhaps prove useful to deploy a warmachine in a forest. That way, your opponent wonít be able to target it with most magic and shooting, and youíll be able to move out of the woods and line up for a flank shot. This tactic mostly favours cannons and bolt throwers.

Protect your rear
When playing offensively, don't forget that some units might try to attack your units in the rear. Flyers, tomb scorpions and the like are just one of the things that leap to mind. Using warmachines or letting a unit hang back to protect the rear of your battleline is a good idea in these cases. Also, a lone Dragon Slayer hanging back, protecting your vulnerable warmachines is also a good idea to look into.


The Basics:

Refused flank:
The refused flank deployment tactic is a fairly generic one, and can be combined with almost any kind of deployment. It relies on you deploying on one of the sides of your deployment zone, in effect using the edge of the battlefield as a Ďflank protectorí. That way, you only have one flank to worry about.

In normal circumstances, the flank not protected by the table edge should be the flank you place your flank protectorís on: Troll Slayers, Organ gun,... Anything that can either stop a charge in its tracks (organ gun) or keep the charging unit occupied for a couple of turns (valiant warmachines, Troll Slayers, Ironbreakers,...).

Double Refused Flank/Deploying at an angle.
This type of deployment is fairly simply and incorporates the good thing that is the refused flank tactic. Deploy your entire army at an angle in such way that the one side of your battleline is protected by the table edge (left/right) of your deployment zone and the other side by the by the edge of the table. (look at the diagram at Deployment tactic 2: The Bear trap for an example.)

Nonlinear deployment.:
Remember, just as your batteline doesnít have to be parallel with your deployment zone, your battleline doesnít have to be a straight line: you can for instance use the refused flank tactic to deploy a couple of units parallell to the side of the table and deploy other units with the double refused flank tactic, by using the flank of the parallel units as a flank protector and the end of the table as the other flank protector.

Deployment Tactic I: The Enduring Mountain

The Enduring Mountain setup depends on you having access to a hill or mountain (one tier or more) in order to work. It is one of the most standard dwarven deployments and suits almost any defensive mode of play. It works on the following principles: Donít move, wait for the enemy to come to you, and in the meanwhile, shoot the living daylight out of all the units approaching your battleline.




Place your warmachines on the hill:
Deploying your warmachines on the hill means that you can deploy them safely behind your lines protected as it were by the main combat units deployed in front of the hill. By doing so, you have ensured that the most direct route to your warmachines for your opponent (up and at them!) is negated since HEíll have to break your combat unit first. Also, since your warmachines are deployed on the hill, they can look over your combat units and look around the entire battlefield, even spot enemy units behind other enemy units, in effect making almost every enemy unit on the table a viable target.

Deploy your missile troops on the hill in ranks.
Deploying your missile units in an x wide and 2 deep formation on ToP of a hill has the benefit that youíve shortened your battleline, which is always a good thing. Remember, every dwarven army needs its units to stick together like the links in a mailshirt: if the gaps in between are too big, the blows/attacks will pass through. Also, since they are deployed on ToP of the hill, all models in the two ranks will be able to shoot. So, in effect, youíve shortened your battleline, added a rank to your unit and made maneuvering the unit easier without reducing itís effectiveness: a win-win situation.
(Addendum: donít forget: if the unit is charged, theyíll start with 2+ combat resolution (high ground and one rank)). In cases like this, it is almost mandatory to have a musician. This investment pays itself back in the +1 to CR in cases of a draw. Also, if the unit is forced to flee for whatever reason and escapes their pursuers, the +1 to Ld to rally will often mean that it can still have some impact in the rest of the game.

Deploy your main combat units in front of the hill
Try to deploy your main combat units (warriors, longbeards,...) in front of the hill, to make sure that the hill is defended from all sides, this to protect the missile troops and warmachines deployed on ToP of the hill. What will happen is that, since the easiest way to your warmachines is now barred, your opponent will have to break your combat units first, a daunting task due to the quality of even the most basic rank-and-file trooper.



A couple of other things to remember with this tactic:
1. Keep your centre strong: use Longbeards, Ironbreakers or Hammerers in the middle.
2. Keep your Battlestandard in the centre, in order that all your units will be able to benefit from the reroll for your breaktests.
3. A cunning opponent will try to keep away from your strong centre and will try to roll up your battleline by attacking on a (weak) flank. In order to counteract this, use strong warmachines/units on the flank, for example, organ guns, troll slayers, ironbreakers, flame cannons,...
4. Keep in mind that your shooting phase is meant to not destroy enemy units outright if it is not strictly neccessary. Use it to cripple them or trim them down in order to grant your main combat units that little edge theyíll need in combat.

Deployment Tactic II: The Bear Trap.

The Bear Trap deployment tactic depends on deploying with a weak center and two strong flanks, often in a double refused flank tactic. The idea behind this is to make the center a tempting target and to corral the enemy units in as it where before hitting them in flank with your flanking combat units.



Make sure your centre looks weak enough but is strong enough:
Deploy your warmachines in the centre, with missile troops supporting them on either side, preferable with at least one rank. These guys should be able to hold out for at least one-two combat phases in the event that they are charged. Chances are that your flanking units can be held up or need to spend an extra turn maneuvering for a good position for the flank charge, so youíll need to make sure that your centre will hold for a couple of turns.

Donít spring the trap too soon:
If you start maneuvering your flanking units too soon, youíll expose their own flanks for a flankcharge, tying them down in combat and with that losing their support for the combat in the middle of your battleline.

Thoughts:
This tactic is, in my opinion, one of the less useful ones. In theory, it sounds nice, but if your centre ends up too weak, your battleline will be torn in two and the leftovers will be facing a rearcharge in the next turn. Any cunning opponent will combine this with either a front charge and/or flank charge it with fast units like cavalry or chariots to make sure that it is destroyed quickly. In effect, he/sheíll divide your army in pieces and conquer it.
If your flanking units get held up in pointless combats, theyíll be busy when your centre is charged and wonít be able to assist it.

But if it works, you have a chance of carrying the day. In conclusion, this tactic is a risky tactic at best.

Deployment tactic IIIa: Deploying offensively: ďThe HammerĒ

This article is not meant as a tactical guide on how to use offensive army lists or on how to compose them but merely focuses on how to deploy them. For more information, look into the Offensive Dwarf Army Tactica by Dark Dwarves.

A tactic not often expected by an opponent is for Dwarves to attack. Quite often, even if youíre doubletiming it accross the board, most players wonít even realise the implications, so used are they to dwarfs playing defensively and being able to get the charge off against dwarfs.

The idea of the hammer is to only use combat units and gyrocopters. Miners and Rangers also fit in this picture in order to tie up the enemy units in early combats with your ranger unit(s) (one more if you include Bugman in your army), marchblocking them with your gyrocopters in order to better dictate the movement of your opponent and better pick your fights and combats. The miners are there to get the occasional flank or rearcharge and/or to dispose of warmachines and to claim table quarters.

The Hammer deployment tactic is not neccesarily a deployment tactic; it is more a battleplan then a deployment tactic. The idea remains the same, but varying situations and battlefield scenery setups may force you to deploy in a different way. Therefore, donít take this deployment tactic as set in stone. Be prepaired to improvise. This advice is valid for all deployment tactics but is perhaps the most valid for the Hammer tactic.

Deploy with a refused flank.
Use the refused flank tactic in order to secure one flank of the battlefield. When fielding an anrmy without any missile troop support, youíll need all the advantages youíll get.

Use strong combat units to defend your flank.
Since youíre going to move forward, deploying with a double refused flank is pointless, since your formation is more then likely to change. Therefore, be sure to include units that are able to stand their own against pretty much anything your opponent can throw against you, and deploy them on the other flank (Slayers, Ironbreakers, Hammerers,...)

Deployment tactic IIIb: Deploying offensively: "Steamrolling towards the enemy"

The Hammer is not the only offensive tactic out there by far. Not every offensive tactic requires you to take Gyrocopters, Miners and Rangers. They do is add some variety and flavour to an offensive army, but also require a totally different way of playing. The easiest would of course be simply taking an army that consists of warriors, warriors, warriors, and warriors, and simply steamroll towards the enemy.

Even in this farily simple case, make sure that you deploy correctly in order to support your battleplan.

Deploy as far in field as your deployment zone allows
While this sounds very obvious, we have already seen enough examples above why this shouldn't not neccecarily be the case. So if you're going to doubletime it accross the board, it won't do deploy to the edge of the table.

If you're going to be taking on a few surprises, make sure you'll be using them
What I mean by this rather vague subsectiontitle is, that if you want to take a few nifty items with you, be sure that they'll fit into your battleplan and that you'll be able to use them to the fullest. For example, if you're going to use the Strollaz Rune, make sure that your BSB is positioned as central as possible, the central position here being generic. If you have another idea or battleplan requiring you to put your BSB somewhere else, than feel free to do so.

Deployment tactic IV: Detachments

The Detachment style of play is a kind of play spearheaded by some of the regulars of the brewery, in particular Bor, Old Lawgrim and myself. It was originally meant only for Empire players, but was also doable by other armies. The only army that couldnít benefit from this mode of play was Dwarfs, due to their low movement characteristic. However, with the new army book and the new incarnation of the Anvil of Doom, it has become apparent that it was exactly what WE needed to make this kind of play possible.

The way it is played is very simple: it depends on large main combat units supported by small maneuvrable detachments of shooting units and/or hard flanking units of Slayers, Ironbreakers, Hammerers, Longbeards,... The detachment in front of the main block will flee from a charge, run into the main block, and be charged by the flanking unit in the following turn.

But, as with every battleplan, it hinges on a good deployment.



Deploy with your battleplan in mind.
I already covered this in the Basics section, but it is doubly true for the detachment tactic. If youíre going to use this tactic, be sure to able to use it! Make sure youíre detachments are deployed on the side of their Ďparent unitsí.


Protect your detachments.
When using detachments, youíll need to preserve them as long as possible, since it doesnít hold to have your detachments slaughtered before combat begins; the entire style of play depends on them! There are a couple of ways to do this:
1. Use meat shields. Use your missile troops to protect your detachments: deploy them in a straight line in front of the parent unit and detachment. This removes the line of sight that can be drawn from an enemy unit to your detachment and will in most case improve the efficiency of your missile units.
2. Deploy your detachments in such way that they arenít easily targeted by magic or shooting. This is especially important when using slayers since these orange furry guys can be downed by the metaphorical splinter.

Protect your Anvil:
When using the detachment style of playing, youíll perhaps come to depend on the Anvil. The great thing about this item is that it doesnít require line of sight. That way, youíll be able to deploy it to the rear of your deployment zone, defended by missile troops, detachments and main combat units.

Deployment tactic 5: Using Rangers/Miners

Miners and Rangers are unique troops in the dwarven army in the way that they are not deployed in a normal fashion. This has the advantage of creating a bit of suspense and tension and may even force your opponent to make deployment errors, since HEíll want to deal with them. That way, heíll be preoccupied for some time, buying you more time to maveuvre in such a way that suits you or give you more time to shoot at him. Also, due to the crossfire rules, rangers and miners in the path of fleeing enemy units will destroy those units once they flee through them.

Also, donít forget that the mere presence of a Ranger of Miner unit on the side of the board waiting to be deployed can be enough to influence an opponentís thoughts and his way off deployment.

Deploying Rangers
Rangers are one of the more special troops in the army of a dwarf player, since they are basicly an upgrade for Warriors, Quarrelers and Longbeards. Warrior Rangers are the most basic ones and the cheapest. Longbeard Rangers benefit both from the Longbeard upgrade as from the Ranger upgrade, and Quarreler Ranger will make for a very shooty advance unit. Each has it's own use and tactics.

The great thing about Rangers is that they can afford to wait for deployment to finish by both sides and can afterwards deploy in the field due to their scout rule. When itís their turn to deploy, you can for instance deploy them in a terrain piece that is central on the battlefield and either marchblock any enemy unit moving in the vicinity, or force your opponent to move around it, thereby forcing him to disrupt his battleline.
Another thing that youíre capable of doing with your Rangers, is just to hold them in reserve until the end of the deployment, and afterwards place them in a weak spot in your deployment zone, that way youíll have a bit more flexibility in answering to the deployment of your opponent. Remember, Rangers may be scouts, but that doesnít mean you absolutely have to deploy them in the middle of the battlefield.

A thing to remember is that when fielding Quarreler Rangers, they can easily be deployed inside a building in order to shoot out of it's windows and benefit from its protective walls. They can keep your opponent busy with missile fire, allowing you to move up to support them. Also, if you're playing in a scenario where you have to control a marker, having a Ranger unit deployed in a nearby building and moving them towards the marker in the later turns of the game is also a gamewinning tactic.



Deploying Miners
Miners can be used in the same way as Rangers in influencing the hand of your opponent when deploying. The good thing about Miners is that they donít even have to be deployed: you can keep them on the side of the battlefield and starting from turn 2, youíll be able to roll a dice to see if they have found their way to the surface and be able to appear on the battlefield from any table edge.
Perhaps your opponent will be intimidated by your miners and deploy more to the back. That way, youíve just bought yourself an extra turn of shooting. Miners can also be used to mob up enemy warmachines or claim table quarters. Also, just like Rangers, Miners donít have to be deployed in reserve: using them to strengthen a weak spot in your deployment is also a valid use for them.
Rangers and Miners can also be used to augment the Hammer and Bear trap strategies.



Well, that's it from ME. All comments are welcome, as are additions and thoughts. I'd like to thank Dark Dwarves, his offensive deployment article helped ME think about the Hammer tactic, and how best describe it.

Cheers,

Dourin

Edited by Dourin, 29 December 2007 - 03:30 PM.


#2 mad ulric

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 06:13 PM

Well done and very useful to newcomers.

I would like to add a couple of things concerning rangers. Caution has to be used in their use. If deployed outside of their own deployment area, they have to be deployed out of sight of the enemy. If they deploy in woods, etc, then it is worth noting that although scouts they are NOT skirmishes and therefore move at 1.5 inches whilst in difficult terrain. This can hamper their use.

However, if there is an appropriate building you can stick them in then they would take some shifting, and I would therefore make them Quarellers with shields, so they can forfill several rolls. Dreawback is they are expensive.

Never the less, your tactica is much welcomed and very useful.

#3 Bor

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 06:35 PM

Well Dourin this piece deserves to get sticked to the ToP of the forum.

Have a few kegs on my tab for this great overview of the option of deployment WE have.

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#4 Orcslicer

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 06:59 PM

Very nice and excellent for newcomers.
Sweet thread Dourin.

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#5 LF - Kevin B

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 07:05 PM

one thing i would add to the agresive area of tactics is to protect your rear. if you go forward the enemy may get round you (beast herds, scorpions, miners, fast cav etc) this is where the deployment of things like organ guns and cannons with grape shot is important. since our missile units cant move and shoot you need to rely on the war machines to cover your back

#6 Dourin

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 07:59 PM

@ Firmshaft&ulric: I've added the aggressive play rear protection bit into the important thoughts section, since it sn't limited to an aggressive style of playing, but is always true.

The idea on deploying in buildings has also been added. I'm not going to add stuff like deploy so many inches away from the enemy since these things are to be found in the army book or the BRB.

@ Bor & Orcslicer: Thanks for that guys, free ale always tastes the best. wink.gif

Thanks for all the idea's thus far.

Edited by Dourin, 28 September 2006 - 07:59 PM.


#7 Bor

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 08:01 PM

QUOTE(Dourin @ Sep 28 2006, 09:59 PM) View Post

The idea on deploying in buildings has also been added. I'm not going to add stuff like deploy so many inches away from the enemy since these things are to be found in the army book or the BRB.


But could it be an idea to give a hint? Like do not place your warmachines and the edge of your DZ if the enemy can charge you on turn 2.


#8 The Dammaz Kronik

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 10:56 PM

This is simply awesome.

Its about time a program which gives diagrams on how things actually look was used to explain things so clearly- its always such a pain to try and word it out, or space type representations of units over many lines of text.

This indeed deserves a sticky or inclusion into the Dwarf Guide as a whole new section. Edit... duh- it clearly IS a dwarf guide article- heh it helps to read the topic TDK...

Dourin my friend- a round to you of the Old Dragonsbreath brew - the special keg was opened earlier this week, and I would like you to have a pint. Its going much faster then it can be made of course- the new batches are still nearly a hundred years form done, and the Older kegs are precious few since its manufacture is such a carefully guarded secret known only to ME and my very best apprentices. Plus old Thorek doesnt let his Dragonflame forge be used too often, so every hundred years or so I get only a few days time to use it for the special fermentation process. Dragons flame is not easily harnessed, and theres no other forge of its like in the known realms.

Drink up- its a celebration this week! Theres been several occasions that have warranted a drink of the finest, and this is yet another one!

Cheers!

TDK

Edited by The Dammaz Kronik, 28 September 2006 - 10:58 PM.


#9 Dark Dwarves

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 01:00 PM

Sorry to bring this up from the dead but its a great article and I was asked to comment via PM and was not available to do so until now.

Overall a very good article, especially for the new players here at the brewery. I don't know if making this a sticky would be appropriate, however I recommend that instead you take what others have offered and revise the article and then post it in the Permenent Library for everyones reference. thumbsup.png

I thought I would add comments where I can, mine are in red.


QUOTE(Dourin @ Sep 28 2006, 05:31 PM) View Post

Try to learn from every game:
The best way to advance your grasp of deployment tactics is to take some notes of your deployment during and after the game, talk the battle over with your opponent. Ask him what you could have done to deploy better, with the battle in hindsight. Remember, every victory is an opportunity to hone your skills. Every loss is an opportunity to overcome errors.

This is not only smart tacticly but its also good sportsmanship. Talk to your opponent, learn all you can even if you know the massacre is on the horizon. No one wants to play a quitter. If its mutually agreed that the game halt early then fine, but by seeing things through to the end you may be suprprised what you can learn from your own units and the enemies.

Deployment tactic III: ďThe HammerĒ

A tactic not often expected by an opponent is for Dwarves to attack. Quite often, even if youíre doubletiming it accross the board, most players wonít even realise the implications, so used are they to dwarfs playing defensively and being able to get the charge off against dwarfs.

The idea of the hammer is to only use combat units and gyrocopters. Miners and Rangers also fit in this picture in order to tie up the enemy units in early combats with your ranger unit(s) (one more if you include Bugman in your army), marchblocking them with your gyrocopters in order to better dictate the movement of your opponent and better pick your fights and combats. The miners are there to get the occasional flank or rearcharge and/or to dispose of warmachines and to claim table quarters.

The Hammer deployment tactic is not neccesarily a deployment tactic; it is more a battleplan then a deployment tactic. The idea remains the same, but varying situations and battlefield scenery setups may force you to deploy in a different way. Therefore, donít take this deployment tactic as set in stone. Be prepaired to improvise. This advice is valid for all deployment tactics but is perhaps the most valid for the Hammer tactic.

The Hammer technique is only one variation on the offensive army. I think a distiction between the Hammer and offensive dwarves is needed here as not all offensive lists require; gyros, rangers and miners. The intent of the offensive army is to advance. The reason is that by advasncing you are limiting the movement of the enemy army by shrinking the space that they have to maneuver in. This is one way to overcome for our lack of speed. The other way is shooting. Every army needs shooting in my opinion. It can take care of things that our normal foot troops have trouble with and also provides combat advantage by reducing enemy units before the armies meet in combat. This alone can swing CR by 2 by denying the outnumber bonus to the enemy while gaining it yourself.



Again, great article.

The Dark Dwarves


#10 TWDwarf

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 12:13 AM

Ah this is great, while I have had a pretty good idea of how to deploy previously during the game I always seemed to be finding a few minor errors. As I've seen said by many on this site deployment is one of the biggest keys to the game (especially for dwarves) and this article is a huge help with tactics and diagrams so have a pint off my tab.

#11 Dourin

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 11:59 AM

Thanks for the comments TWDwarf and Dark Dwarves.

To be honest, I was a bit dissapointed with the reception this article got. The regulars (Bor, TDK Orcslicer, Firmshaft) responded but I'm sure that many others read the thing (the total number of views next to it in the tavern kind of hints to this, 7 replies to 235 views is a bit meagre to say the least). As I said, all comments are appreciated, so people, If you read this and want to add your two cents or discuss something, PLEASE feel free to do so.

Regarding posting this in the Library, I opened a topic in the Notices and Questions subforum asking for a new 7th Edition subdivision so that I might post it in the right place.

EDIT: Edited the article, adding Dark Dwarves' suggestions.

Edited by Dourin, 03 October 2006 - 12:26 PM.


#12 Yorri&Gottry

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 01:05 PM

I was reding it too, and was mighty glad that you made it,
It is a master work, but to answer it I diodnt have time, I concure with almoust everithing you said and now I ma debating to put a unit of 14 hammerers on expens of 1 cannon or 2 bolt throwers...???



#13 Gnorri Grungson

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 01:20 PM

Deployment is absolutely crucial, imo the most crucial part of the game, I would say it is a rare game indeed when I don't make a mistake or few in this most crucial of phases, for Dwarfs even more so than others because we lack the movement to rectify mistakes easily. I always try to learn from every game and usually manage to do so and one of the things I have learned is that no matter how bleak things can look when you've just had a disaster of a turn 4 by the end of turn 6 things can have turned right around, though because we play slow and late I often still do concede if things look bad turn 4/5 and its close to or gone midnight. These Dwarf guides are great in a couple of years I'll be able to show them to my eldest boy and he can learn all this great wisdom early. thumbsup.png


#14 Royal Lochnagar

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 06:18 PM

Great work, Dourin!

This could be one of the most important sections of the Dwarf Guide. It is my firm opinion that at least 60% of the battle is won by deployment for Dwarfs. The other 40% is shooting and CC, but definitely more than half the battle can be attributed to how you deploy.

You nailed all the right tactics and covered everything I could think of. For that, get an ale and PIODT; but buy the cheap stuff. Get a round of the finest on my tab, in fact have two if it doesn't knock you off your feet! I really appreciate this effort you've put forth, Dourin. This is the reason I keep coming back to the Brewery.

~Mike D.

#15 Dunrik Ironhammer

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 06:44 PM

Great work indeed Dourin, have a keg on my tab for the effort. It is nice that you (and Darke Dwarves, Orcsliser, BLOOD AXE, Bor, TDK, Firmshaft…) are helping not so experienced players (like me) so much. Thanks to you all! and a round on me.

Cheers

Dunrik


#16 Dourin

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 10:47 PM

Thanks Durin, Barbalargas, Yorri and Gnorri for the comments. It seems my 'cry' for a bit of attention paid off. tongue.gif

I've thought of another deployment tactic I could enter, but I'll take my time for it since it's a tactic that is not easily describable.

Cheers,

Dourin

#17 Gaulric Axerender

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 04:02 AM

Dourin it is people like you who help people like me to become better and more experienced at a game grin.png thank you. Deployment seems much more complicated in whf than in 40K, safe to say it seems more of a tactical game. If i had a tab, i would get you a pint of some good rich ale. thumbsup.png

#18 Thorgrid Runesplitter

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 09:48 AM

in very large games what do people do with these tactics. The most effective to me seems to be the enduring mountain, but what do we do if we run out of space?

#19 Blackthorne

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 11:12 PM

Thanks a bunch dourin. This really helps. I am still not as proficient in deployment as I would like to be, but this really helps. I will add any advice I come up with as I play more games.

#20 danceman

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 11:58 PM

Great guide, thank everyone involved. Some things were already obvious to me, other stuff I hadnt thought about much.

Cheers and thanks again, Dancey!




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